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Had the chance to buy a few E & J Gen X'ers recently

E & J is the oldest brush maker in the United States. They have been continuously operating for over 200 years (since 1796). The company is almost as old as America itself! That is something that resonates with me. I feel like I am holding a little piece of painting history in my hands (despite their recent acquisition).

I like Chinex (even for interior painting) specifically because of the firmer filaments. Stiff bristles make straighter lines - funny how some customers can base the quality of an entire paint job solely on the ceiling line. True, the stiff bristles can sometimes cause "thin spots" on walls, but this is usually a non-issue (covered with the second coat). The trim paint I am currently using "levels-out" rendering brush-strokes unnoticeable, so I don't feel the need for softer bristles.

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The Beech wood handle is comfortable, and it is a good-looking brush overall. I prefer the soft wood handles over Maple. I find that as they are slightly lighter, and wear better: the soft wood becomes porous/raised and "grippier" (that's a technical term). The stainless steel ferrule has an attractive brushed finish, which suggests a higher quality stainless (but is still magnetic). The stamped logo is a nice detail that I imagine will age with a colorful patina of paint around the visible embossing. Thank you E&J for not slapping an ugly sticker on the ferrule!

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The E&J is a noticeably heavier brush than I am accustomed to. The extra weight may add minor fatigue when using all day (particularly between the thumb and forefinger). This is an important point to consider for interior work, when one wants to have a steady hand and a responsive brush to cut sharp lines.

There appears to be more bristles in the head than other brushes (see how full the belly is all the way to the toe of the brush!). This is great, because it will hold a lot of paint. However, it also makes the tip less sharp, and possibly less suited for cutting-in lines in corners and tight spaces. E&J has tapered the bristles, presumably to counter this, but a less-full head may be an easier solution (imo) for certain applications.

Disclaimer: I have not painted with this brush yet, but first-impressions are mostly positive, and may update this post if my opinion changes drastically. I use Chinex almost exclusively, and have used dozens of Purdy's, Woosters, and Coronas with the Chinex filament, so I have a pretty good idea what I'm looking at by comparison. I am currently painting interiors, and decided immediately that these E&J's would make ideal brushes for exterior work; The full head would be superior for handling heavier-bodied exterior paints, and would hold up better to staining rough-cut Cedar.

@stelzerpaintinginc. I wonder if you have any opinions about this brush- I thought you mentioned you recently purchased a few cases?

My only minor gripe is in regards to quality control. Of the six brushes I purchase, five of them had stray or kinked bristles (random brush -pictured- showing a few stray bristles). At this point it does not immediately affect the function of the brush, but I have not seen this fault in other brushes, and consider it potential QC issue to watch in the future.

All in all I think E&J makes a high-quality brush, and have all the hallmarks of a brush that will perform well for many years.

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The E&J is a noticeably heavier brush than other brushes I am familiar with. This is because the head is fuller. There appears to be more bristles in the head than other brushes I have used (see how full the head is all the way to the end of the brush!). This is great, because it will hold a ton of paint. However, it also makes the tip less sharp, and less suited for cutting in lines in corners and tight spaces. The extra weight also adds some minor fatigue when using all day. This is an important point to consider for interior work, when one wants to have a steady hand and a responsive brush to cut sharp lines. E&J has tapered the bristles, presumably to counter this, but a less-full head is a better solution (imo) for certain applications.
FYI you can get them in a thinner angle sash too (pictures 2" TAS right. 2.5" A/S left)
 

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FYI you can get them in a thinner angle sash too (pictures 2" TAS right. 2.5" A/S left)
Wish I could find these around me. If what I found online is correct they are made in NJ. I am 1 state away but I don't know where to get them and haven't seen them. I emailed them last week asking but never got a response.
 

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Wish I could find these around me. If what I found online is correct they are made in NJ. I am 1 state away but I don't know where to get them and haven't seen them. I emailed them last week asking but never got a response.
I got several on Ebay. Two Gen X and a Gen Y.
I loved the X, but all of a sudden it's shedding bristles in clumps. I don't paint full time and certainly didn't get my money's worth out of it. Hopefully the second will last longer. Most of my brushes are Purdys so I really wanted to try these, but this has made me want to try Picassos again.
BTW, the X I only used for cutting in walls and ceilings. The Y was purely for trim. And I really like it.
 

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Anyone came across this Blaze brush from Proform? I prefer an oval brush so normally use a Picasso or Richard Fat Boy but liking this so far and seems to holding up well too.


Sent from my SM-G781W using Tapatalk
 

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Anyone came across this Blaze brush from Proform? I prefer an oval brush so normally use a Picasso or Richard Fat Boy but liking this so far and seems to holding up well too.


Sent from my SM-G781W using Tapatalk
my problem with Proform is that information is scarce. For example, what type of bristle is being used in the blaze?
All I can find online is that it is a "synthetic", which we already knew. Instead of actual information, it only states that it has "fine bristles" that can sometimes get hung up in itself, but can easily be combed out- Do you find that to be true?

Looks like it has a big belly (can hold a lot of paint).
 

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my problem with Proform is that information is scarce. For example, what type of bristle is being used in the blaze?
All I can find online is that it is a "synthetic", which we already knew. Instead of actual information, it only states that it has "fine bristles" that can sometimes get hung up in itself, but can easily be combed out- Do you find that to be true?

Looks like it has a big belly (can hold a lot of paint).
Blaze, as in other proform brushes, uses a blend of PBT/PET made in China.
 

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my problem with Proform is that information is scarce. For example, what type of bristle is being used in the blaze?
All I can find online is that it is a "synthetic", which we already knew. Instead of actual information, it only states that it has "fine bristles" that can sometimes get hung up in itself, but can easily be combed out- Do you find that to be true?

Looks like it has a big belly (can hold a lot of paint).
Holds a alot of paint which is great and haven't had any issues with bristles getting hung up in themself yet but only on the third job.
I struggle with the Corona and Purdy brushes as they are too thin but thats just my preference, I keep trying them as I know alot of painters rave about them so I must be missing something. Had high hopes for the Purdy 3 inch oval brush but felt It didn't release paint very well.

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Holds a alot of paint which is great and haven't had any issues with bristles getting hung up in themself yet but only on the third job.
I struggle with the Corona and Purdy brushes as they are too thin but thats just my preference, I keep trying them as I know alot of painters rave about them so I must be missing something. Had high hopes for the Purdy 3 inch oval brush but felt It didn't release paint very well.

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To each their own.
Whatever works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
Just got a corona today...will try it out tomorrow! Still using the Wooster ultra, which I’m using more and more and like more than the Purdy clearcut. I also tried a Picasso, but thought it was “too firm” if you will...it was challenging to manipulate it into corners like the others...this has been a fun thread to read! Thanks for sharing everyone!
 

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I like Chinex (even for interior painting) specifically because of...
These are the only ones I'm using for everything inside and out, best of all for cutting in.
Also sometimes just getting Silver or Gold tip on the go, when I have something unprepared to do and toss them away after couple of uses.. they become brittle fast.
 

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my problem with Proform is that information is scarce. For example, what type of bristle is being used in the blaze?
All I can find online is that it is a "synthetic", which we already knew. Instead of actual information, it only states that it has "fine bristles" that can sometimes get hung up in itself, but can easily be combed out- Do you find that to be true?

Looks like it has a big belly (can hold a lot of paint).
They are using chemically tipped PBT/PET filaments extruded in China. Brush also manufactured by a Chinese company (same manufacturers of Monarch Brushes in Australia and UK). Essentially these have great performance properties however the filaments have very short life (they also did a decent job in choosing the brush mix). If you are familiar with Wooster Silver Tips or Arroworthy Rembrandt, they are using practically same cost filaments and processing techniques, but ProForm are adding a huge markup on customer because they feel performance can back it up (in reality if they were using a fair markup these would be going for $15 CAD/12$USD) . They generally lack consistency (due to made in China) but overall have decent performance (it's you and your luck if you get a brush that loses a lot of filaments). Not worth the price for the markup because they are overcharging you imho ... they are charging like its using DuPont filament which can be found in brushes like Corona Cortez or Purdy XL.

They are sold by ProForm Technologies out of Wyoming as private label and resold at a high markup.
 

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They are using chemically tipped PBT/PET filaments extruded in China. Brush also manufactured by a Chinese company (same manufacturers of Monarch Brushes in Australia and UK). Essentially these have great performance properties however the filaments have very short life (they also did a decent job in choosing the brush mix). If you are familiar with Wooster Silver Tips or Arroworthy Rembrandt, they are using practically same cost filaments and processing techniques, but ProForm are adding a huge markup on customer because they feel performance can back it up (in reality if they were using a fair markup these would be going for $15 CAD/12$USD) . They generally lack consistency (due to made in China) but overall have decent performance (it's you and your luck if you get a brush that loses a lot of filaments). Not worth the price for the markup because they are overcharging you imho ... they are charging like its using DuPont filament which can be found in brushes like Corona Cortez or Purdy XL.

They are sold by ProForm Technologies out of Wyoming as private label and resold at a high markup.
You can get them for around $16 plus hst if you buy in bulk. Not a bad price imo.

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