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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Yeah, the wood guy already passed on this job. I’ve stripped veneer but haven’t applied veneer.

Anyway, I questioned the evenness of the fade as well. Under those sculptures is darker and every door and rawer top edge is dark. The insides were not originally stained. I don’t have pictures but, the top edges of the large doors are dark and then faded out at the front edge. I think too, maybe the inside door panels got darker from no sunlight.

IDK. The wood guy probably built the thing for this designer so I’ll take her at her word.
 

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Walnut fades like mad in UV light and can turn bleached blonde in < 5 years.

I've never seen that, and have seen plenty of the opposite. But I'll not argue the point as it won't help anyone.



But all the UV light in the world won't re-arrange the grain from tiger maple stripes to basic long grain walnut. Look at the grains on the top. That and the interior of the door are two totally different things. Although, I just looked closer at the pics on the sides, and there I don't see the tiger stripes. The top is tiger maple (or similar). The sides? Can't say. Strange piece to be sure.


But if the wood guy passed on it, then worrying about this aspect of it doesn't help the conversation. All I know at this point is that I'd likely learn a lot watching lynn experiment with how to replicate it. And I look forward to seeing pics.
 

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I've never seen that, and have seen plenty of the opposite. But I'll not argue the point as it won't help anyone.



But all the UV light in the world won't re-arrange the grain from tiger maple stripes to basic long grain walnut. Look at the grains on the top. That and the interior of the door are two totally different things. Although, I just looked closer at the pics on the sides, and there I don't see the tiger stripes. The top is tiger maple (or similar). The sides? Can't say. Strange piece to be sure.


But if the wood guy passed on it, then worrying about this aspect of it doesn't help the conversation. All I know at this point is that I'd likely learn a lot watching lynn experiment with how to replicate it. And I look forward to seeing pics.


I’m not debating or in disagreement that the wood is maple, agreeing that it is as previously stated. I’m also well aware that UV light doesn’t magically rearrange figure in wood and create tiger stripes. FYI, tiger or flame figure is inherent to several different species including black walnut, flamed walnut looking very similar to the maple’s in Lynn’s photos, less the brown tones. There’s a good example at the following link:

https://lairat.com/portfolio_page/flamed-walnut-3/

Recent experiences also dictate, after having spec’d, provided resources for sourcing, and having finished ~ 15,000 board feet of lumber which consisted of a mix of domestic black and white walnut (aka butternut) on my present project, that black walnut is very susceptible to drastic color fade in the presence of sunlight, so much that my client had Lutron solar shades installed, and scoffed up every cotton duck drop cloth at every local Sherwin Williams dealer within a 20 mile radius, using them to cover all the more expensive walnut furnishings & countertops in order to protect them from fading when the home isn’t occupied during the week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
That photo is stunning. I’ve never seen black walnut like that. Gorgeous. I’m no wood expert but what I've always have seen in walnut that I don’t think I’ve seen in other wood is how jiggidy jaggedy the growth rings are.

So there’s a 100 year old black walnut tree directly across the street from my house. Every time we get thunderstorms I picture it getting struck in half and demolishing my house. I wonder if the county knows how valuable that tree is.
 

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A stunning pc of walnut that will make a stunning guitar body. (And hopefully play loud, obnoxious hard rock music).


@Redux, looking at what I wrote I guess it seemed more argumentative than intended. I was looking at the pic of the interior of the door, and of the top of the piece and just didn't see any way that these were the same species or cut of wood regardless of fade. I was just trying to imagine the interior of that door fading to look like the top and couldn't see it. Of course they're just pics which are not worth 1,000 words in the subtleties of wood finish.


Anyway, I'm sure lynn will come up with something good and inspire us with pics.
 

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I know of one type of wood that would be impossible for Lynn to emulate by any faux means due to it’s chatoyancy & iridescence.

A client of mine had a custom dining table fabricated out of a massive live edge slab of 50,000 yr old prehistoric Kauri wood, having never seen or heard of the wood before.

The ancient Kauri trees thrived in New Zealand’s swamp-like environments, living for nearly 2000 years before dying off. After dying off, the massive trees remained perfectly preserved for tens of thousands of years in the peat bogs where they fell. The prehistoric trees are extracted from the bogs and sawn into useable timber. The iridescence and chatoyancy of the ancient Kauri is unmatched, almost resembling a 3-D hologram. The present day Kauri trees are however a protected species and aren’t harvested for timber. Below is a link illustrating the Kauri’s iridescence.


Below is a link of the extraction.

 

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I know of one type of wood that would be impossible for Lynn to emulate by any faux means due to it’s chatoyancy & iridescence.

A client of mine had a custom dining table fabricated out of a massive live edge slab of 50,000 yr old prehistoric Kauri wood, having never seen or heard of the wood before.

The ancient Kauri trees thrived in New Zealand’s swamp-like environments, living for nearly 2000 years before dying off. After dying off, the massive trees remained perfectly preserved for tens of thousands of years in the peat bogs where they fell. The prehistoric trees are extracted from the bogs and sawn into useable timber. The iridescence and chatoyancy of the ancient Kauri is unmatched, almost resembling a 3-D hologram. The present day Kauri trees are however a protected species and aren’t harvested for timber. Below is a link illustrating the Kauri’s iridescence.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nFeL6ijIxOI

Below is a link of the extraction.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nU2vcYuutWA

Holy shhhh cow. That's pretty amazing. I do love wood.
 

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I know of one type of wood that would be impossible for Lynn to emulate by any faux means due to it’s chatoyancy & iridescence.

A client of mine had a custom dining table fabricated out of a massive live edge slab of 50,000 yr old prehistoric Kauri wood, having never seen or heard of the wood before.

The ancient Kauri trees thrived in New Zealand’s swamp-like environments, living for nearly 2000 years before dying off. After dying off, the massive trees remained perfectly preserved for tens of thousands of years in the peat bogs where they fell. The prehistoric trees are extracted from the bogs and sawn into useable timber. The iridescence and chatoyancy of the ancient Kauri is unmatched, almost resembling a 3-D hologram. The present day Kauri trees are however a protected species and aren’t harvested for timber. Below is a link illustrating the Kauri’s iridescence.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nFeL6ijIxOI

Below is a link of the extraction.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nU2vcYuutWA
That's incredible!
 

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Old-growth logs especially ones that have been underwater for hundreds of years are extremely valuable and highly sought after. https://www.washingtonpost.com/arch...the-sea/245e847a-57e1-4a88-b011-6b81cc820d61/

And lets not forget about petrified wood!
https://geology.com/stories/13/petrified-wood/#forest
Yup. I’ve worked a lot with old growth sinker cypress pulled from swamps. The pics are of old growth cypress which had been submerged for ~ 200 years. I wet the boards with mineral spirits just to illustrate the colors. The different colors are due to the different bottoms where the logs were pulled from.

I once did a floor that was fabricated out of 1000+ yr old English bog oak. The logs were extracted from peat bogs and milled up into a grid work which picture framed reclaimed 13th century medieval heraldic tiles. I did all the final surfacing using crude hand tools in order to maintain period character.

I also had a client purchase a 16th century English countryside timber frame relic farmhouse. The oak skeleton was carefully disassembled, each part labeled, shipped to the US, and reassembled, with a new structure built around it. I was told that the oak sub-species had long since been extinct. Don’t laugh at the photo...it was taken some 38 years ago in the early 80’s..been at this painting & wood finishing way too long..
 

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So, that's where all those 80's **** flicks where the housewife seduces the painter got their start.
 
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So, that's where all those 80's **** flicks where the housewife seduces the painter got their start.
Actually you’re not too far off...rather than adult entertainment flicks, it’s actually where several Oscar winning movies got their start, being that the client was a Hollywood screenwriter & movie director..
 

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Woodgraining is a lost art, it was usually done to imitate quarter sawn oak in the very early 1900's. Anyone ruining that fiddle maple with a paint brush trying to woodgrain it should be forced to paint the Brooklyn Bridge with a 2" sash brush. The piece needs to be sent out to a furniture restoration shop. My 2 cents...

Regards
Gemstone
 

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My 2 cents, it looks like it was bleached with wood bleach. Way to even to be color fade.

I would suggest staining, if it was bleached it will absorb even more stain. If there is a clear coat, obviously that would have to be removed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 · (Edited)
As hard as it is to believe, this piece has not been chemically bleached.
As far as wood bleach, it’s clear coated. It would need to be stripped to be bleached. I know it’s clear coated based on my observation of missing areas of clear on the top surface,wear and tear. As I already stated, the tops of drawers that were protected are very dark. The wood guy refused to strip it because it’s veneer.

In person it’s much easier to see the variances due to sun damage. On the one picture with the Christmas bulbs you can see a faint vertical line on the leg demarcating the faded part from the unfaded.

Table Room Floor Furniture Skateboard


Wood Plywood Wood stain Table Furniture


Wood Plywood Wall Font Table


Wall Wood Floor Line Architecture


Furniture Shelf Table Desk Plywood


This piece sits in a house that literally has 20 ft of glass front, right, left and skylights.
 

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As hard as it is to believe, this piece has not been chemically bleached.
As far as wood bleach, it’s clear coated. It would need to be stripped to be bleached. I know it’s clear coated based on my observation of missing areas of clear on the top surface,wear and tear. As I already stated, the tops of drawers that were protected are very dark. The wood guy refused to strip it because it’s veneer.

In person it’s much easier to see the variances due to sun damage. On the one picture with the Christmas bulbs you can see a faint vertical line on the leg demarcating the faded part from the unfaded.

View attachment 107031


View attachment 107033


View attachment 107035


View attachment 107037


View attachment 107039


This piece sits in a house that literally has 20 ft of glass front, right, left and skylights.
The fading doesn’t surprise me and I deal with it often, working primarily on modern beach homes where all the perimeter curtain walls are floor to ceiling glass.

Many times faux wood graining is really the only option due to a lot of furniture veneers being just too darn thin in order to strip, or by being limited by having to work with the existing finishes.

This thread sorta reminds me of one instance with that DC designer David who you’ve worked with, having me look at 4 beautiful custom built veneered furnishings which were made for one of my clients, yet the clients wanted them redone shortly after taking delivery for one reason or another. After I’d met with his furniture maker, both he and I had concurred that the veneers were just too darn thin to strip or to work with the existing finishes in order to achieve the look the client had hoped for. Being somewhat inept at wood graining and not a faux artist by any means (aside from the basics), I didn’t put that option on the table, having passed, more like ran and didn’t look back.

Looking forward to seeing what a real artist (you) can do @ making magic happen with that piece.
 
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