Professional Painting Contractors Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been reading some posts on this forum about XIM products, and they seem to be gaining in popularity. I am thinking of using them for the first time on an exterior project I have coming up, and would appreciate anyone's input or thoughts about their products.

The project includes a few thousand square feet of brand new rough cut cedar shake siding. What I am thinking is that I would like to find a way to use all water clean up products if I could, but I am hesitant to stray from a solvent based primer/sealer for the cedar. So the option I am imagining is to spray prime and back brush the cedar with Peel Bond(I will add the tannin bleed stop additive) and topcoat it with two sprayed coats of latex.
The other option, which is what my instinct tells me to do, is use their solvent based primer/sealer, the 400W, and then topcoat that with two coats of latex.

Has anyone used Peelbond in the manner I am describing???

What I am most interested in is the longevity of the paint job. In my experience, the problems with cedar start when the primer or topcoat begins to fail and/or crack. Since I am the one applying it, I know that the topcoat will not be the problem, so the only thing I have to worry about is tannin bleed and adhesion of the primer. I want to go the route that will give me the longest life and least chance for adhesion problems w/ the primer.

I have had great success with traditional oil primers in the past, but I am trying to open myself up to the idea that Peelbond is the way to go. The main advantage would be that if it performs the same as oil, I won't have to mess around with solvents anymore. That would be a huge plus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hi Chris,

I know what you mean, but with new cedar, I tend to opt for an over dose! I do not want any chance of an adhesion or tannin problem down the road. And, this customer wants to pay top dollar for the maximum possible longevity. One side of the house gets a lot of weather as well, it will be hammered with sun and rain.
 

·
PinheadsUnite
Joined
·
30,724 Posts
Just don't email them requesting to be taken off their F-ing spam list

:whistling2: :thumbup: :jester: :whistling2: :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Id stick with solvent for primer (from my understanding anything with water activates these tanning bleeds) I think?...

top coat with whatever 100% acrylic you like.

Oils penetrate cedar really well. Best option would be to prime cedar ALL sides before it goes up, I feel that would give you a longer lasting finish than anything else.

on the other hand acrylics remain flexible over time. You could use the XIM primers and then spot prime with oil any of the bleed and top coat 100% acrylic.

Everyone will have a personal best way of doing things.
anyways good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi Got,

From my understanding, the same properties that make water borne coatings flexible & breathable(advantages) are what make them more prone to bleeding. And likewise, the properties that make oil more rigid and barrier like are what make them less prone to bleeding(advantage). I will be using the additive to stop the tannin bleed, so that takes the advantage away from solvent based. The main question for me is whether or not the Peelbond will really truly perform as well as oil in the long run, when it is used as a raw wood primer. I guess I am assuming that their tannin blocker additive really does work, and I do not know that for a fact ;) I've never used it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
AND I totally agree with what you said about pre-painting all sides before install. But that's not the case here, wish it was!!!
 

·
Painting Contractor
Joined
·
4,066 Posts
From my experience peel bond wouldn't be my first choice for your application. I would opt for something like BM 094, or if sticking with the water borne systems, use the Zinsser smart prime. Recently shot out a new cedar lattice with the smart prime and BM aura and it looked great, no bleeding
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,530 Posts
Hi Chris,

I know what you mean, but with new cedar, I tend to opt for an over dose! I do not want any chance of an adhesion or tannin problem down the road. And, this customer wants to pay top dollar for the maximum possible longevity. One side of the house gets a lot of weather as well, it will be hammered with sun and rain.
Work did you read this post?

Is this a diy project?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top