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red flag number one, contractor to employee you dont get paid if I dont get paid lol
Listen, Dave, I never not paid somebody. But for the sake of arguement - how does an employee expect me to pay them, or even continue to employ them if I go around telling my customers to F' off all the time.
 

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I guess the employee is supposed to share the risk of ownership :laughing:
This might be worth exploring. Maybe have them sign off on the sections they painted so if theres a call back you can forward it to the appropriate painter.
 

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Listen, Dave, I never not paid somebody. But for the sake of arguement - how does an employee expect me to pay them, or even continue to employ them if I go around telling my customers to F' off all the time.
Dan I wasnt trying to imply you never paid anyone sorry if it came across that way, I defiantly think your a stand up guy. :thumbup:

For the second part of the question well are you out of your mind:eek:, zero tolerance for questions like that, sorry but I would rather work on quote watch then have someone like that work for me, you got to be out of your mind if you listen to a employee and keep him around if he talks like that, not even worth discussing
 

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Do you let the painters know what you charge for a job or what is your rate?
In my case, only some of them know what i charge only if i ask them to collect the check at the end of a job.
I'm wondering if it would be better if everybody knew it ?
Good question! It's a fine line.

In general, I believe striving for transparency is always best. But we don't live in a perfect world.

The other day I had an employee mention he thought we should "split" the client payments for these jobs. Meaning the total payment. I said I agree! I'll bring you your share of the invoice for the new $9600 Contractors Trailer. And the Licensing Fees and Taxes to get it registered. Also all the Liability and Property & Casualty Insurances. Oh, and BTW, you need to kick in your portion of the cost for the $3700 airless sprayer, brushes, Rollers, and other tools. I'll bring you all those invoices, plus your share of paint costs. My last paint bill was $1400 plus change.

He laughed and walked off.

Some employees get it. Some don't.

My employees hear me discuss all the expense of running a business. I discuss it openly. Not in a condescending way. But in a transparent way. They need to know that contingency funds are there to protect THEM from downturns and bidding errors. My costs for all my taxes, insurances, and vendors are regularly increasing. And if we all want to keep our jobs, we need to find ways to combat these increases. Some are difficult to pass along to the customer.
 

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Good question! It's a fine line.

In general, I believe striving for transparency is always best. But we don't live in a perfect world.

The other day I had an employee mention he thought we should "split" the client payments for these jobs. Meaning the total payment. I said I agree! I'll bring you your share of the invoice for the new $9600 Contractors Trailer. And the Licensing Fees and Taxes to get it registered. Also all the Liability and Property & Casualty Insurances. Oh, and BTW, you need to kick in your portion of the cost for the $3700 airless sprayer, brushes, Rollers, and other tools. I'll bring you all those invoices, plus your share of paint costs. My last paint bill was $1400 plus change.

He laughed and walked off.

Some employees get it. Some don't.

My employees hear me discuss all the expense of running a business. I discuss it openly. Not in a condescending way. But in a transparent way. They need to know that contingency funds are there to protect THEM from downturns and bidding errors. My costs for all my taxes, insurances, and vendors are regularly increasing. And if we all want to keep our jobs, we need to find ways to combat these increases. Some are difficult to pass along to the customer.
This thread is from 2011. Just saying. Good points though..
 

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Good question! It's a fine line.

In general, I believe striving for transparency is always best. But we don't live in a perfect world.

The other day I had an employee mention he thought we should "split" the client payments for these jobs. Meaning the total payment. I said I agree! I'll bring you your share of the invoice for the new $9600 Contractors Trailer. And the Licensing Fees and Taxes to get it registered. Also all the Liability and Property & Casualty Insurances. Oh, and BTW, you need to kick in your portion of the cost for the $3700 airless sprayer, brushes, Rollers, and other tools. I'll bring you all those invoices, plus your share of paint costs. My last paint bill was $1400 plus change.

He laughed and walked off.

Some employees get it. Some don't.

My employees hear me discuss all the expense of running a business. I discuss it openly. Not in a condescending way. But in a transparent way. They need to know that contingency funds are there to protect THEM from downturns and bidding errors. My costs for all my taxes, insurances, and vendors are regularly increasing. And if we all want to keep our jobs, we need to find ways to combat these increases. Some are difficult to pass along to the customer.
Dead thread, but good topic.

I believe that is a huge mistake (talking pricing with employees) and one that I have made in the past.
There is a fine line between informing employees of "what's happening" within the company (ie., we're going to be doing the job this way, here are some policies we must follow, this customer has special needs, we have time contraints we must contend with etc...).

I tend to think out loud when dealing with a problem, or organizing work flow and logistics, and in the past I have overshared pricing issues with employees. Nothing good comes from it, and several bad things usually result.

It is not the employees business to know how much the customer is spending. It is okay for you to make a profit, and it is not the employees place to know how much. I find that it distracts them from doing their job well, and eventually they end up resenting you. Best not to mention anything to do with pricing- first rile of thumb: protect the customer's privacy. Customers have a right to have personal information protected, such as pricing from the workers. I always ask to discuss matters privately when the customer confronts me with specific questions (eg., perhaps we could wait to discuss that when we have some privacy, or could I get back to you about that, or could we move over here to discuss the particulars, etc...)

Nip that in the bud right away, or you will have problems from your employees, such as asking to split profits, followed by you divulging more confidential information such as your tax burdens, etc...

Tell them to get back to work, and focus on doing a good job. They only care about themselves and they will resent you if you make more than them, no matter the reason. They don't know what the expenses are, they don't care, and they shouldn't be involved.
 

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I’m a firm believer in open-book management.
Not sure how that would work for a small business.
I'm all about empowering the employee, but asking for trouble involving 'Part Timers' and 'Summer Help' in the day-to-day financial operations. Been there, done that.
 
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